Men who send ‘d**k pics’ to strangers face two years in jail: Cyber-flashers will be forced to sign sexual offenders register under law change in England and Wales Currently, there is no law directly tackling cyber-flashing in England and Wales But now, cyber-flashing is set to be included in the Sexual Offences Act 2003 It follows warnings over lack of accountability and identity-checking measures In 2021, research found 4 in 10 millennial women were victims of cyber-flashing

Men who send ‘d**k pics’ to strangers will face up to two years in jail and be made to sign the sex offenders register under a law change in England and Wales.

Cyber-flashing is when a person is sent an unsolicited sexual image on their mobile device by an unknown person nearby through social media, messages or other sharing functions such as Airdrop.

There is currently no law which directly addresses cyber-flashing in England and Wales, despite the act being made illegal in Scotland around 12 years ago.

But now, in a move which intends to reflect penalties for indecent exposure in public, cyber-flashing is set to be included in the Sexual Offences Act 2003.

It comes after researchers warned that a lack of thorough accountability and identity-checking measures are helping to fuel the online sexual harassment of young people.

In a move which intends to reflect penalties for indecent exposure in public, cyber-flashing is set to be included in the Sexual Offences Act 2003 (file photo)

What is cyber-flashing?

Cyber-flashing is the act of someone deliberately sending a stranger an unsolicited sexual image using the AirDrop feature on an iPhone. These images are typically of male genitalia.

AirDrop, which is specific to iOS devices such as iPads and iPhones, as well as Apple Macs, uses Wi-Fi and Bluetooth to connect over a short range to other devices.

People are often targeted by cyber-flashing through AirDrop on public transport due to the technology’s short range.

There is currently no law which directly addresses cyber-flashing in England and Wales, despite the act being made illegal in Scotland 12 years ago.

Read the full article from the Mail Online below:

Source: Cyber-flashers will have to sign sexual offenders register under law change in England and Wales

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By / Published On: February 7th, 2022 / Tags: , / Categories: News, Online Safety /

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